Your Culture Is Your Brand

Building a brand today is very different from building a brand 50 years ago. It used to be that a few people got together in a room, decided what the brand positioning was going to be, and then spent a lot of money buying advertising telling people what their brand was. And if you were able to spend enough money, then you were able to build your brand.

It’s a very different world today. With the Internet connecting everyone together, companies are becoming more and more transparent whether they like it or not. An unhappy customer or a disgruntled employee can blog about bad experience with a company, and the story can spread like wildfire by email or with tools like Twitter.

The good news is that the reverse is true as well. A great experience with a company can be read by millions of people almost instantaneously as well.

The fundamental problem is that you can’t possibly anticipate every possible touchpoint that could influence the perception of your company’s brand.

For example, if you happen to meet an employee of Company X at a bar, even if the employee isn’t working, how you perceive your interaction with that employee will affect how you perceive Company X, and therefore Company X’s brand. It can be a positive influence, or a negative influence. Every employee can affect your company’s brand, not just the front line employees that are paid to talk to your customers.

At Zappos.com, we decided a long time ago that we didn’t want our brand to be just about shoes, or clothing, or even online retailing. We decided that we wanted to build our brand to be about the very best customer service and the very best customer experience. We believe that customer service shouldn’t be just a department, it should be the entire company.

Advertising can only get your brand so far. If you ask most people what the “brand” of the airline industry as a whole is (not any specific airline, but the entire industry), they will usually say something about bad customer service or bad customer experience. If you ask people what their perception of the US auto industry is today, chances are the responses you get won’t be in line with what the automakers project in their advertising.

So what’s a company to do if you can’t just buy your way into building the brand you want? What’s the best way to build a brand for the long term?

In a word: culture.

At Zappos, our belief is that if you get the culture right, most of the other stuff — like great customer service, or building a great long-term brand, or passionate employees and customers — will happen naturally on its own.

We believe that your company’s culture and your company’s brand are really just two sides of the same coin. The brand may lag the culture at first, but eventually it will catch up.

Your culture is your brand.

So how do you build and maintain the culture that you want?

It starts with the hiring process. At Zappos, we actually do two different sets of interviews. The hiring manager and his/her team will do the standard set of interviews looking for relevant experience, technical ability, fit within the team, etc. But then our HR department does a separate set of interviews, looking purely for culture fit. Candidates have to pass both sets of interviews in order to be hired.

We’ve actually said no to a lot of very talented people that we know can make an immediate impact on our top or bottom line. But because we felt they weren’t culture fits, we were willing to sacrifice the short term benefits in order to protect our culture (and therefore our brand) for the long term.

After hiring, the next step to building the culture is training. Everyone that is hired into our headquarters goes through the same training that our Customer Loyalty Team (call center) reps go through, regardless of department or title. You might be an accountant, or a lawyer, or a software developer — you go through the exact same training program.

It’s a 4-week training program, in which we go over company history, the importance of customer service, the long term vision of the company, our philosophy about company culture — and then you’re actually on the phone for 2 weeks, taking calls from customers. Again, this goes back to our belief that customer service shouldn’t just be a department, it should be the entire company.

At the end of the first week of training, we make an offer to the entire class. We offer everyone $2000 to quit (in addition to paying them for the time they’ve already worked), and it’s a standing offer until the end of the fourth week of training. We want to make sure that employees are here for more than just a paycheck. We want employees that believe in our long term vision and want to be a part of our culture. As it turns out, on average, less than 1% of people end up taking the offer.

One of the great advantages of focusing on culture is when reporters come and visit our offices. Unlike most companies, we don’t give reporters a small list of people they’re allowed to talk to. Instead, we encourage them to wander around and talk to whoever they want. It’s our way of being as transparent as possible, which is part of our culture.

We’ve formally defined our the Zappos culture in terms of 10 core values:

1) Deliver WOW Through Service
2) Embrace and Drive Change
3) Create Fun and A Little Weirdness
4) Be Adventurous, Creative, and Open-Minded
5) Pursue Growth and Learning
6) Build Open and Honest Relationships With Communication
7) Build a Positive Team and Family Spirit
8) Do More With Less
9) Be Passionate and Determined
10) Be Humble

Many companies have core values, but they don’t really commit to them. They usually sound more like something you’d read in a press release. Maybe you learn about them on day 1 of orientation, but after that it’s just a meaningless plaque on the wall of the lobby.

We believe that it’s really important to come up with core values that you can commit to. And by commit, we mean that you’re willing to hire and fire based on them. If you’re willing to do that, then you’re well on your way to building a company culture that is in line with the brand you want to build. You can let all of your employees be your brand ambassadors, not just the marketing or PR department. And they can be brand ambassadors both inside and outside the office.

At the end of the day, just remember that if you get the culture right, most of the other stuff — including building a great brand — will fall into place on its own.

——-
Do you have a story about how your company’s culture has positively or negatively impacted your company’s brand? if so, leave a comment below!

You can also find more information about how we manage our company culture at Zappos at: www.zapposinsights.com

Follow me on Twitter: @zappos

——-

Comments

467076225's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC28636 said:

Interesting post, Tony. But how has your brand or, even more important, your company's reputation been impacted by recent layoffs?

David www.davidhenderson.com

468821944's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC28649 said:

Tony, those are good thoughts to enter 2009 with!

At our company, culture is extraordinarily significant. However, I will confess that we set it up to be that way. From the beginning, we knew that we not only wanted to be different, but that we actually were. Different. Both naturally and intentionally. The folks that we brought on our team needed to 'get' that. 12 years later we have an incredible team, and they are definitely able to deliver on the fact that they 'get' what we're all about because it's a collective 'we'...meaning that they are what we are all about.

Our informal Mission Statement is "Be Amazing." That's it. We don't have a formal Mission Statement because we don't need one. In my opinion, they are for companies that might not know what they're doing or what they're all about. We do. It's who we are.

Cheers!

Greg Koch CEO Stone Brewing Co.

44627605's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC25892 said:

Tony,

Well said. Our company seeks to function as yours does. I hope we do as well). Values must permeate. Our founders (I'm not one, so I can praise them) continually practice "Be Humble." Another key value is "Lead by caring."

The WOW factor is especially important in our industry: hospitality and restaurants. Performing some unexpected nicety, for no particular reason, helps maintain the WOW--just as Zappos' unexpected shipping upgrade does. One of our founders calls that unanticipated opportunity to show extraordinary hospitality, "Walking around looking for doors to open."

Thank you, to you and to the entire Zappos team, for being a model for so many of us.

Richard Peck Table 301 and Soby's Restaurant www.sobys.com

468822804's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC28658 said:

Great thoughts. I've always told my company that we don't have a mission statement, we only have values. But linking that to the culture is something we've been missing, I saw that first hand on my tour of Zappos earlier this week. You can definitely see it all put together, congrats!

Jeremy Hanks President & Cofounder Doba

468823346's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm johnflurry said:

Tony, I respect your hiring process a great deal. A few months ago I had the opportunity to interview with a great organization. Their process was similar to yours, with a two tier interview, first for the basics of job qualification and then culture fit. I had all of the skills to do the job successfully but in the end we both agreed it was not a fit. It came down to chemistry. Many companies totally ignore that factor. Skills and resume are nothing when you can not get along with those you work with. As I look around me there are very few companies that would even consider employee fit within their culture. The result is lots of unneeded frustration and unrealistic expectations. Customers suffer as well as the brand. @johnflurry

42611031's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC28760 said:

Tony, I really admire your hiring process! How creative.

My question is regarding your current list of values. How do you ensure that people can remember 10 of them? In my experience working with CEOs of growth companies, employees can usually remember no more than five.

Thanks, Lisa http://blog.energizegrowth.com

468516593's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC25737 said:

Tony, am %150 satisfied with your company. Zappos not only made my holiday shopping completely worry and stress free, but your remarkable return process just blew me away. When the operator told me the new shoes will be here the next day my jaw dropped. Now I ordered a pair of work boots and I needed them by monday but I did not have the money for the next day ups. Your amazing company showed me that you really do care about people and not the ol' mighty dollar, you gave me free next day because I needed the boots by monday. I am comming to Zappos for all of my footwear and I am going to tell everyone I know about your stellar company. Keep it up and you will be a household name in no time.

Thank You for rising above every other company and making the costumer first, and really meaning it. James

39768137's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm Brett H. said:

test

38411457's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29216 said:

I wish more people understood this. My last position was with a company that demanded a "smile in my voice" when on the phone. How, exactly, am I supposed to smile when I'm wondering when the axe will fall on my neck? Security is as much a part of job satisfaction as anything else. I don't need beer busts every Friday or management-catered Thanksgiving lunch nearly as much as I want to feel like I matter to my employer, and they have my back.

I'm worth it!

466943252's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm Michael said:

As a former employee at Zappos, I can say not a week goes by that I don't mention how much I miss every aspect of the Zappos culture to my current co-workers.

I've been striving to keep those core values alive, even though I'm not working in a similar situation or company. I've found that people react well to it.

As to the CLT, it was only $500 when I went through it (as a developer), but I can definitely say it impacted how I felt about the company in a positive manner. Nothing says how much you care about your customers than the CEO sitting on the front lines, taking orders from customers or helping them fix problems.

Keep up the good work, Tony!

468859733's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29234 said:

Tony,

Thank you for sharing this.

I've implemented a powerful hiring process in my company that's different from what majority of businesses do. But what I now realized is that I don't invest enough time, effort, energy, and money into the initial training of new employees!

By the way, I've invited a handful of my best clients and we are scheduled to travel to Vegas to tour your company on Jan 29 or 30. It would be an amazing treat if we had a chance to meet you for a few minutes while we are there. I look forward to that experience.

Smiles, Adam

468640958's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29236 said:

Most companies that think they have a Mission Statement do not have one. A Mission Statement should be something that every employee in the company can spend two minutes with and then recall verbatim for the rest of their career there. Today, far too many Mission Statements are actually vision statements or statements of principle. A goodly number of those sound more like some New-Age religion than something from the business world or even applicable to that world.

Most company cultures change over time. That time period may be very short or very long. In general, what happens is the original start-up group lives, eats and breathes the company. "You need 60-hour weeks? Hey, I'll give you 80! Just get me some pizza and soda!"

The first group of new employees are easily infected by the vast energy when they come into the business and that culture becomes their way of life.

Down the line, inevitably, replacement employees are looking at the job as a pay check, not a life style. When this happens, the culture begins to make a dramatic shift.

As this transition occurs, the relationship between the company and the customer will change. We have all experienced it again and again as customers: "Remember when this place first opened, they knew who we were by name and beverage and were making it before we got to the counter. Now I am just another customer." Everyone of us has dozens of personal examples from all walks of business life.

As brought forth by others, this was a common failing when it was a one-tier hiring process and company culture was a non-existent arena of thought and practice.

The two-tier process is a potential solution with plenty of anecdotal evidence.

Only time will really tell.

jim who advocates a company curmudgeon

468860156's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29244 said:

Hi Lisa,

My name is Rachael Brown and I work in the Training and Leadership Development department at Zappos.com. In response to your question regarding how do we ensure our employees remember our 10 Core Values, I think a lot of this stems from what Tony discusses above about our new employees understanding our vision & culture through the hiring and 4-week training process. During the New Hire training, we do spend a half an hour to an hour for 10 days on each of the Core Values, but this is not the main reason employees remember them. As Tony said, our Core Values are very committable. Our Core Values are not only 50% of each employees performance review, but they are intertwined with our day to day. They are part of our common language. In daily email and passing conversation, employees use our Core Values as common lingo. We also recognize our co-workers when they exhibit a particular Core Value. We do this in many ways, but one fun visual way is our Core Value Logo Item Contest. For example, we have a steering wheel key chain to represent Embrace and Drive Change. Each is under a $1 and we tried to pick a physical representation of the core value since it helps people visualize and remember/connect with them in another way. Since our Core Values are so intertwined with our identity as Zappos employees, it makes them difficult not to remember :)

466943252's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm Michael said:

Hey Rachael! Long time no see. :)

Don't forget (at least in KY) we had the cards that fit in the badge holders with the Core Values on it. :) I wonder if they still give those out...

468860156's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29244 said:

Hi Michael! Yeah, I guess we upgraded since we now have our Core Values printed on our badges :)

466943252's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm Michael said:

Nice! Reduces the amount of plastic one has to carry, I suppose. :)

468860274's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm Kaplan Mobray said:

Tony Great perspective on the power of culture within an organization. I would offer that a company's culture creates its brand only when its employees are empowered to translate corporate core values into how they view themselves, and use that view to be an active stakeholder in their success. It looks like what you have done with your core values is create the opportunity for your people to be known for something. This ultimately is what your customers experience and thus your people become your brand supported by your culture. The more your customers identify with your people the less you will need to rely on traditional advertising. Great Job!

468155780's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC24106 said:

I am a customer, a twitter follower and a big time believer in "your culture is your brand". I spent over 10 years in the advertising biz and then almost 4 years running my own wedding and event company. EVERY EMPLOYEE is the brand. It really does go back to the old adage of "one bad apple can spoil the bunch". I wish I could move to Vegas and be a part of your brand. Congrats on getting it!

Kindest Regards, Kristine Bates Dallas, Texas

468875548's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29472 said:

Hi Tony,

This is a great entry on building a brand around the culture. I have followed the success story of Zappos for years now and it is the perfect business model for any company to follow. You've done a great job at promoting the company atmosphere and it shows through the countless word of mouth promotion by your very own customers. When a brand actually thinks its bigger than it's employees, they are completely wrong. Way to go, Tony. I wish you continued success.

@mtnsurfer

468892402's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC29671 said:

Do you ever think about entering into the Surf Culture? I think it could be very beneficial and catchy "surfing" the web with Zappos. You could have featured/sponsored surfers. I love Zappos and would love to represent the company with all my travels around the world competing. I'm a professional surfer/model, I would love your input on my site and feelings towards this

http://ericahosseini.com

erica hosseini newport beach, california

469490700's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm John Jacobs said:

Hi Tony,

Zappos is a great example of how companies can choose service to customers. It really does not matter if your company is one person or thousands of employees, scaling a business can be done in a customer-centric style, and founding values can be shared by all members of your company!

We appreciate the example that you have set and hope that your commitment to serve will continue to be contagious as Zappos grows!

Respectfully,

John Jacobs, President ArtFire.com @ArtFireJohn

470130488's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm iamrasa said:

Branding the culture of happiness into the heart of a corporation while integrating it with the heart of reality of oneself, takes a genius! Good work, Tony...now it's time to stepupnow.us and transform all happiness charts into charts of joy ...so bliss can be insight. Blessings of the O wave coming soon...bobby O bahama

470175509's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC50092 said:

I will confess that we set it up to be that way. From the beginning, we knew that we not only wanted to be different, but that we actually were. Different. Both naturally and intentionally. The folks that we brought on our team needed to 'get' that. (+spam+)

470130488's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm iamrasa said:

I was just TALKING to Stephanie and was being totally "WOWED" before the very strange static arrived on line and then was disconnected. I wanted to ask Stephanie to invite all her co-workers including Tony to bring their BEST customer service talents and skills to http://ChalkTheWhiteHouse.com and to Washington D.C. the week of President Obama's Birthday..as a shining example of the THE BEST customer service in the nation...bring all your ten cultural points including your artistic fun and weird side to CHALK around and around and around The White House in celebration of the President's Birthday and in celebration of co-creating and co-designing a more perfect union...and HAVE A MOST PERFECT DAY !!! Can't wait to see and experience ALL your masterpieces!!!

470317987's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC52490 said:

I'm completely and totally impressed. Anybody know of any companies who use this type of approach in the Twin Cities area?

470353989's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm sharmooz said:

Great insight. Thanks for sharing your company's vision.

466275196's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm MariAnn said:

I love the way that Zappos has embraced the world of social media. Congrats on your great success. It's obvious why you were chosen as one of the Top 100 Companies to work for -- YOU GUYS ROCK! (not to mention you have the best selection of shoes and clothes around!!)

Mari Ann @MariAnnLisenbe

470376651's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC53081 said:

Most companies that think they have a Mission Statement do not have one. A Mission Statement should be something that every employee in the company can spend two minutes with and then recall verbatim for the rest of their career there. Today, far too many Mission Statements are actually vision statements or statements of principle. A goodly number of those sound more like some New-Age religion than something from the business world or even applicable to that world. --- I'm a (+spam+) Gamer and a fan of (+spam+).

470268143's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC51523 said:

Another great reason why giving great customer service will get you far in business. especially with the internet today. http://johnmorgan.easyjournal.com/

470394753's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC53340 said:

Ya Zappos must have something in it thats why its a leading brand today.. I myself have done lot of shopping from Zappos.. (+spam+) - (+spam+) (+spam+)

466373534's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm Runway Rundown said:

Interesting thoughts Tony. thanks for sharing them!

I myself AM my own culture which has led to my own brand!!!!

www.runwayrundown.com

Looking forward to the future!

Kim

470633808's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC56750 said:

But how do you climb up to the bunk desk? Or is that part of the charm for management - you climb up via a removable ladder that is only put back in place once you have completed all your work for the day..? ;-) (+spam+). Regards,

470642424's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC56863 said:

This message is truly inspiring. This rare mix of true core values and this WOW philosophy is truly inspiring for any startup entrepreneur, innovator, e-business and business aficionado. Congratulations on Zappos's success and I am really curious to see what the Amazon purchase will blossom into. Thanks for the good .(+spam+). Regards,

470651824's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC56995 said:

Tony I hope your company brands gets its success. I think you have an original view which is very important. Advertising is also necessary though these days

(+spam+) (+spam+)

470658644's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC57109 said:

great company, great place to work.. what else can you want

(+spam+)

470702414's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC57656 said:

Amen to that. I only have a few employees, but the culture of my company exponentially increases my business revenue. Oh oh it's magic.

Radek from (+spam+) and (+spam+)

470960393's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC60661 said:

Nice content! Pointing out good ideas and concepts. This could be a great help for others too. I'll tweet this up!

http://www.postpublished.com/

470102021's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC60970 said:

This message is truly inspiring. watch 500 days of summer online This rare mix of true core values and this WOW philosophy is truly inspiring for any startup entrepreneur, innovator, e-business and business aficionado. watch the ugly truth online Congratulations on Zappos's success and I am really curious to see what the Amazon purchase will blossom into. watch gamer online

471031843's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC61300 said:

It is nice to see another company that values customer service in this way. Our engagement rings company receives compliments on great customer service all the time. It almost seems like people are accustomed to horrible service and are shocked when they actually receive good service. I am glad to know that we are not alone in our companies philosophy of making the customer feel that they are important.

471066994's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC61541 said:

Customer Service is very important. Great points shared. Thankyou. Another great site for advice and free resources I came across was: http://www.paramounttraining.com.au

471031843's picture
Jan 6, 2010 at 4:55 pm ZC61300 said:

Good customer service is what business should be all about. We run a motel reservations business that actually includes customer reviews for every hotel and motel out there. I know that when any one of my friends or family travels, they always read those reviews first to see what the hotel is like. Bad customer reviews can kill a business. It is amazing that more businesses don't understand that concept. Then they are surprised when they go out of business. Any company that has this type of business philosophy will be rewarded with my patronage.

472436256's picture
Jan 15, 2010 at 9:42 am PatrickB1424 said:

The Zappos thing is *way* overrated. A company like NewEgg that has been around for the same amount of time in a much more competitive market has created more value than Zappos. Amazon itself has zero customer service and is far more successful than Zappos . Why are people so enamored?

472839526's picture
Feb 24, 2010 at 1:57 am fangfangh3400 said:

yuh,you are right,brand for everything all very important,create a brand is not a easy thing thank you for share your idea mbt emu boots mbt

474219984's picture
Jul 11, 2010 at 7:53 pm AnnT12830 said:

I think you've succeeded. Last night, around the dinner table, family members discussed the company's customer service. We include: an international company's recently 'retired' VP & current consultant, & his wife, a retired journalist; a national marketing director of another company; a VP for Communications for yet another company; a Chief in the healthcare services division of a large state agency, & a young aspiring writer who works for FIT. Everyone was raving about Zappos, the customer service, reasonable prices, company policy, etc. There were comparisons to other companies/online sites, and much head-shaking over how easily customer loyalty can be lost by a bad experience. As the eldest commented, "So, the next time you're going to buy a pair of shoes, where will you go? Not _____. You'll go back to Zappos. This is why they're successful."

474219984's picture
Jul 11, 2010 at 7:55 pm AnnT12830 said:

I think you've succeeded. Last night, around the dinner table, family members discussed the company's customer service. We include: an international company's recently 'retired' VP & current consultant, & his wife, a retired journalist; a national marketing director of another company; a VP for Communications for yet another company; a Chief in the healthcare services division of a large state agency, & a young aspiring writer who works for FIT. Everyone was raving about Zappos, the customer service, reasonable prices, company policy, etc. There were comparisons to other companies/online sites, and much head-shaking over how easily customer loyalty can be lost by a bad experience. As the eldest commented, "So, the next time you're going to buy a pair of shoes, where will you go? Not _____. You'll go back to Zappos. This is why they're successful."

474302048's picture
Jul 20, 2010 at 3:08 am kumarshyam42 said:

The success of 'Delivering Happiness' means many companies will now try to ride this new wave of service cultures.

The Zappos culture may seem to have grown itself, but companies who try to build a culture of superior service in chaos (Let's start a culture book! OR Let's have a vendor day!) without crossfunctional strategic alignment will probably fail.

Customer service speaker Ron kaufman has this great short video about the main problems companies face -

http://snipurl.com/uysc-5-problems-to-overcome

Hoping that Zappos goes international soon so I can be a buying customer...

474610791's picture
Aug 17, 2010 at 2:39 pm annep15400 said:

Tony Hsieh is a remarkable guy. He seems like an introvert, somebody whose mind is constantly processing multiple ideas and figuring out innovative solutions that would further the Zappos empire. And yet, at the end of it all, this man weighs his achievements on 2 parameters - values and culture. I like the way his leadership style is analysed here - http://www.brandpilgrim.com/2010/08/valuation-of-values.html

475695737's picture
Nov 11, 2010 at 9:09 pm PeopleMatterH23581 said:

Service in the service industry isn’t always a given. What’s the key to unlocking the exceptional customer experience, and how can this translate to greater revenue for your business? Find out the link between culture and brand this week with the PeopleMatter Institute’s latest blog post here: http://www.peoplematter.com/blog/culture-connection-linking-culture-bran...

466365301's picture
Nov 14, 2010 at 1:18 pm GinaR23908 said:

It is surprising to me that Zappos solicits reviews from customers who have made recent purchases and then edits them to Zappo's favor. While I was satisfied with the product, I commented that the cost of the product was higher than other web sites. Therefore, I questioned whether the shipping was really free. This was deleted from my review. I thought the company wanted honest feedback from their customers. Apparently, they are only looking for positive press. Very disappointing.

475695737's picture
Nov 17, 2010 at 9:32 pm PeopleMatterH23581 said:

Service in the service industry isn’t always a given. What’s the key to unlocking the exceptional customer experience, and how can this translate to greater revenue for your business? We finally reveal how a strong culture and brand in your restaurant, c-store, hotel or other hospitality or retail establishment can mean big bucks for your business in the second installment of our “Culture Connection” blog series.

http://www.peoplematter.com/blog/culture-connection-linking-culture-bran...